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Fitness Regime Mindset Motivation Uncategorized

Why you shouldn’t wait for the perfect time to start

Something I was thinking about the other day was how we are always waiting for the perfect time to start.

Whether it’s starting a new job, a new relationship or a new fitness routine, we tend to wait for the circumstances to be right.

But life doesn’t work like that.

It’s very, very difficult to find that perfect time.

There’s always going to be stress at work

There’s always going to be a lot going on

It’s always going to be someone’s birthday or wedding.

When we wait for things to be perfect, we never actually start and make those changes.

And we miss out on all the good things that come from starting something new.

it can even be detrimental to our self esteem when we keep saying we are going to do something but don’t actually take the action.  We start to mistrust ourself as we don’t believe what we say.

So if you needed some motivation to start something – this is it.

Don’t wait for the perfect time.  Once you’ve made the commitment, you’ll make it work.

Your future self will thank you.

Love Kat x

Categories
Boxing tips Mindset Motivation Uncategorized white collar

Getting Comfortable with Punches coming at you

Are you thinking about training to fight?

Our January Fight School intake have started training!

If it’s something you are interested in, this is the time to consider signing up for our next fight school as places go fast.

Here’s a bit more about the programme from coach Anthony Young.

Nutrition and Mindset 

We want to help you get in shape, but we also want to teach you how to do it the right way. Our
nutrition and mindset workshop will help you learn how to eat healthily without depriving
yourself, how to set realistic goals for yourself and your workouts, and how to build a strong
inner core that can carry you through any challenge life throws at you.

Conditioning – becoming comfortable with punches coming at you and preparing your body and mind for
combat.
Conditioning is the first stage of fight camp and it’s about getting your body used to the rigours
of boxing. Boxing is an extremely intense sport, so this initial phase allows you to acclimatise to
the movement required for fighting and allows you time to adjust your diet before cutting weight,
if required, for a fight.
At this stage, conditioning involves learning how to move in a ring as well as doing
cardiovascular exercise such as boxing specific drills, running, cycling or swimming in order to
improve endurance. It also involves strength training circuits including exercises such as squats
and lunges in order for your body’s muscles and tendons to get used to the high intensity nature
of boxing.
During the conditioning phase, our tech sessions are spent getting accustomed to having
punches thrown at us. This can be a daunting prospect!
For many of us, it’s easy to get caught up in the idea that boxing is all about hitting other people.
But what we’ve found is that the real value of boxing comes from learning how to defend
yourself—and that means knowing how to take a punch.

You can’t learn to swim without getting wet… and you can’t learn to box without getting hit.

So we start off by working on our defensive skills, which means learning how to use our hand
defences and to move our head, once comfortable avoiding punches we’ll work on
counterpunching. This gives us an opportunity to focus on what’s going on without getting
overwhelmed by our own fear of being attacked. We gradually build up our intensity with each
session until we’re ready for more advanced techniques.
The overall aim of this stage is to get your body and mind used to the demands of boxing so
that you’ll be able to train harder and longer without getting injured.

Do you want to understand how to eat for weight loss or to maximise your performance?
Perhaps you’re confused by all the trending fads: low fat, low carb, keto, intermittent fasting
etc… What is really the best way to eat? In our nutrition and mindset workshop you will learn the
principles to keep things simple. This session will provide all the info you need to get your
nutrition on track and explain the importance of mindset and why you need to do the brain work
too.

The workshop will include an interactive session where you can ask questions and get
answers from our experts. You will learn: What is the best way to eat for weight loss or performance?
What does macronutrient breakdown mean?
What are good fats and bad fats?
How much protein do I need and what are some good sources?
How often should I eat and how many meals per day should they be split into?
What, if any are the benefits of ‘fasting’ (intermittent fasting)?
Do I need to take supplements (pre workout, BCAA etc…) in order to train harder & longer
without getting injured?

The second phase of a boxer’s training is the skill development stage. This is when you begin to
learn the “moves” that will be used in competition, such as combination punching and defensive
manoeuvres. We will produce a blog post around this topic at a later date.

Conclusion
We are very excited to have a busy and enthusiastic group undertaking the current programme, who fill fight in The Clapham Grand on Thus 16th March.  This group are about to embark on a journey of self growth as well as becoming unbelievably fit and honing their boxing skills.  There is no greater challenge than getting into the ring and overcoming your own fears as well as taking on an opponent.

If you think you are up for the challenge and you would like to join our next intake starting in May, apply at the link below and we will be in touch.

Apply Here 

Thank you for reading.

 

Categories
Boxing tips Exercise Tips Fitness Regime Motivation

Benefits of Pad work

Pad work is an effective training method used to help get boxers fight ready, but did you that
know it has heaps of mental and physical benefits for people of all ages and fitness levels?
Check out our top 5 benefits below:

1. It helps to reduce and/or manage stress
 
It’s no secret that exercise causes the release of endorphins, the feel-good hormones! It’s
also a great mood booster generally, it works as a form of meditation, and improves sleep.
All of which helps to reduce and manage stress.
When you’re focusing and pushing yourself through a couple minutes of high-intensity
punching, you don’t have much mental space left to worry about work or stress about
relationships. Punching the pads can help you release any pent up negative emotions you
might be storing, so if you’re not in a great place, it is a great way to transform your mood.
Trust us, those endorphins will be flowing for hours after your workout too!

2. Improves Hand-Eye Coordination

If you have good hand-eye coordination, you’re likely to have quick reflexes and reaction
times. This is an important skill to work on, especially as we age, as coordination and
balance become compromised, increasing the risk of falls.
Pad work is a fantastic way to improve your hand-eye coordination because when you’re
hitting the pads, you must be able to see, react to, and hit the constantly moving and
changing target. Pads provide a much smaller target (than a bag) so require maximum
attention from the boxer to punch on target. It is therefore a must for anyone wanting to
develop their accuracy in boxing.
It’s certainly challenging, but with practice on the pads, your hand-eye coordination will
improve considerably!

 3. It improves your cardiovascular fitness 
Cardiovascular exercise is any vigorous activity that increases your heart rate and
respiration and raises oxygen and blood flow throughout the body while using the body’s
large muscle groups. Cardio offers a plethora of benefits from reducing health risks to
lowering blood pressure.
The combos strung together in pad work effectively ramp up your heart rate in a short space
of time. It is a high intensity, low impact form of interval training that is guaranteed to improve
your stamina and fitness levels. Punch your way to a healthy heart at 12 Rounds Boxing!

4. Improves Total Body Strength

All that jabbing and hooking requires a surprising amount of strength! Participating in regular
pad work sessions will lead to a significant increase in body strength in a fairly short period
of time!

5. Increases Muscle Mass and Promotes Weight Loss

As pad work simultaneously decreases fat mass and increases muscle mass, it is great for
both weight loss and improving body composition!
It perfectly combines muscle-building, strength training moves and intense, calorie-burning
rounds of cardio. Regular pad work sessions will therefore result in changes to your body
shape whilst helping you shed those unwanted pounds – win win!

6. It’s a fantastic mental workout too!

Rest assured pad work isn’t just a great physical workout. It’s also fantastic for improving
concentration and cognitive skills, as the boxer is required to remember punch sequences
and link combinations which is a tough mental workout!

7. It’s the fastest way to improve technique

Lastly, it is one of the fastest ways to improve technique due to the one-on-one time with the
coach. So if you’re looking to step into the ring or want to perfect your angles and punching
technique, hitting the pads is a non-negotiable!

Essentially, pad work is a fun and versatile way to improve fitness for people of different
ages, strengths and fitness levels! Give it a try soon at 12 Rounds Boxing!

Categories
mental health Mindset Motivation Uncategorized

MENTAL BENEFITS OF BOXING Guest post by REAL

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As a buisness 12 Rounds is very much a supporter of mental health awareness.  Founder Kat has spoken and written about this a lot.

The post below is a guest post from Max Fraser, of REAL; High-performance sportswear, inspired by boxers and it clearly outlines the benefits of boxing on mental health.

 

Boxing is as much mental as it is physical. At the very highest level of competition, the difference between winning and losing is the fighter’s mentality. Both boxers will be physically primed to endure 10-12 rounds of explosive exertion. The physical conditioning and preparation for a fight is very much in the control of the boxer; this is the easy part. Preparing mentally is far harder. When the bell rings, can you control your adrenaline, retain composure under fire, with the confidence to resist intimidation or self-doubt, harness fear and project it on to your opponent, with the depth of desire to fight through the pain.
At any level, competitive and non-contact boxing training brings untold physical and mental benefits. This article focuses on the mental benefits of non-contact, recreational boxing.

1) Empowerment
Learning how to punch properly and unlocking your full power is an awakening. The moment you hear a full volume smack of your glove hitting the pads or bag, the exhilaration will have you hooked. Then learning how to harness your power while throwing bunches of punches gives your confidence a great lift and this transfers to daily life, boosting self-efficacy and the ability to deal with challenging situations better.

2) Uplifting
There are four things that can lift mood; a sense of achievement, enjoyment, closeness to others and somethings that’s beneficial to the body. Boxing has all four. It’s inclusive, social and something to look forward to. Whether it’s in a class, hitting the pads or holding someone’s feet while they do sit-ups, you’re never doing this alone.

3) Combat Depression and Anxiety
A spike in physical activity releases neurochemicals like endorphins and neurotransmitters such as dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine. Endorphins are nature’s pain killer and act like a blissful sedative; serotonin regulates mood, dopamine signals reward and noreprinephrine enhances alertness, helping you focus. This cocktail of neurochemicals and transmitters drives communication between brain cells to better regulate physical and emotional health.

4) Stress Relief
Boxing is a proven way to de-stress and ease tension – hitting things is both fun and therapeutic. Exercise releases norepinephrine (a neurotransmitter) improving cognition and clarity of thought clouded by stressful events. Central and sympathetic nervous systems work together, improving the body’s ability to respond to stress. Exercise further helps balance stress hormones like cortisol and adrenaline.

5) Active Meditation
When your body is busy, your mind is distracted and free. Co-ordinating combinations while trying to hit a moving target, takes focus and one has to be entirely present. This distraction is a break from the outside world and clears the mind.
At whatever level you’re boxing, it will put you on the edge of your physical comfort zone and this is where we grow. Each time you push one more inch, there is a cascade of mental benefits. The body only achieves what the mind believes.

Article by Max Fraser, Founder of REAL
High-performance sportswear, inspired by boxers.

www.realpowerofone.com

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Categories
Boxing tips community Mindset Motivation

Getting started with boxing

There is always a daunting feeling in the pit of your stomach every time you think about starting something new.

Will I be good enough? am I too old? Too unfit?  Will I fit in?

These are some of the questions that we berate ourselves with.

The truth is, must of your fears are probably unfounded, but that doesn’t stop them creeping in and sometimes stopping you from starting at all.

Here are a few worries people generally have about learning to box:

Initial Fears

  • ‘I don’t know what I’m doing’ – of course you don’t, everyone starts from the beginning; some pick it up faster than others. In reality you’re not as bad as your think you are. Coaches don’t expect you to be great boxers or inferior. As long as you’re teachable, everything else will fall into place.

 

  • ‘What will other people think of me’ – Sorry to break it to you, but other people are too busy worrying about themselves haha. Seriously though, boxing is made up of people from different backgrounds shaped by different experiences. It really is a judgment free zone.

 

  • ‘Will I have to spar?’ – Sparring is a big part of the sport as it prepares you for a fight or in boxing terms; for battle. At most reputable gyms newcomers are never thrown into sparring on the first day, or even the second. An understanding of the fundamentals and basic punching and defending techniques must be shown first before you’re trusted to go into the ring and spar.

Sparring isn’t everyone’s cup of tea and that is perfectly normal. There are classes catered to those who wish to learn the art, or just get a good work out in, without the pressure of having to spar.

 

  • Intimidation factor – Boxing clubs have gained an unfair reputation of being a less then welcoming place. An unforgiven haven of brutality mixed with the smell of sweat and sawdust.

This couldn’t be further from the truth. Boxing clubs are in fact very family orientated with members often feeling like they belong. Some of the best of friendships are formed in a boxing club.

 

 


One of the things we are renowned for at 12 Rounds Boxing is our signature boxing fundamentals course for beginners.  Some gyms do throw beginners in with experienced fighters.    We don’t believe this provides a good experience for anyone.  A much better way is to offer a programme which teaches the basics of boxing BEFORE you progress and where everyone is at a similar starting point.  Our boxing fundamentals programme does just that.  Over 4 weeks you’ll learn stance, guard, movement and how to put basic punch combinations together.  It will also super charge your fitness. Each session involves body weight circuit training combined with boxing drills as well as learning technique.  There is nothing quite like boxing training to take your fitness to a whole new level.  Again, we don’t believe in throwing you in the deep end.  Over the 4 weeks our coaches will build on your fitness week by week.  We even fitness test you at the beginning and the end of the course so you can see the improvement.

If you like the sound of that and are ready to get started, our Boxing Fundamentals course runs monthly.  Don’t just take our word for it though.  We offer a free taster session for anyone new to the club.

Book yourself on here and come along and quash those fears.

 

[author] [author_image timthumb=’on’]https://12roundsboxing.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/0ca675ea-bcfe-4b5f-a2e4-b1da853ea6ab.jpg[/author_image] [author_info]Scott has been boxing since he was 18 and has an impressive amateur record of over 50 fights. His talent was spotted early. When he first walked into Islington Boxing Club he was put straight into the competitive class and had his first fight 3 months later. Scott has fought all over the country and travelled to extensively including to South Africa where he won boxer of the tournament. Now retired from competing Scott is excited to put his skills and energy into coaching[/author_info] [/author]

Categories
mental health Mindset Motivation Uncategorized

PTSD and how boxing can make you better

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Following our fundraiser for Help for Heros, Jake Duggan shares a bit of background and info on PTSD and how boxing is a fantastic tool in aiding recovery.
 
 
POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER (PTSD)
 
 
Here is the best example that shows how our minds cannot tell the difference between reality and what’s in our imagination.
 
If I asked you to imagine (in full detail) going into your kitchen, grabbing a lemon from your fridge, smelling it for a second, cutting out a wedge and then biting into that wedge.
 
 
I guarantee you, your mouth will start salivating and reacting as if it had just bitten into that lemon.
 
Now lets think about a traumatic event.
 
It is natural to feel afraid during and after a traumatic situation.
Fear triggers many split-second changes in the body to help defend against danger or to avoid it.
This “fight-or-flight” response is a typical reaction meant to protect a person from harm.
 
For those suffering from PTSD however, this ‘flight-or-flight’ response doesn’t stop after the event.
 
One part of our brain is call the Amygdala, which is responsible for processing our short term memories to long term memories.
 
In the case of PTSD, that particular traumatic memory becomes stuck within our short term memory.
 
As a result of this whenever someone with PTSD experiences a ‘trigger’
 
For example:
– A soldier who has been in a firefight in the Middle East = A loud bang.
– A victim of sexual assault = the smell of a particular brand of deodorant that the offender had on.
– Someone who was in a horrific car crash = a specific song that may have been playing on the car radio at the time.
 
Instantly, their mind will take them back to that particular traumatic situation and make their body BELIEVE they are there again and trigger that ‘fight-or-flight’ response sending a massive amount of adrenaline throughout their body.
 
Now imagine that happening to them and they are at a restaurant or grocery shopping?
They know they aren’t in any danger but if they don’t even know they have PTSD this can be a very frightening and exhausting experience.
 
Having to deal with constant and frequent similar episodes, they can start to seem disinterested or distant as they try not to think or feel in order to block out these painful memories.
This is what leads them down the path towards depression and anxiety disorders.
Eventually causing them to stop participating in work, social & family life and ignore offers of help, leading to loved ones feeling shut out.
Or in the worst and saddest cases, leading them to taking their own lives to make it all stop.
 
Even though they may think they don’t need it, people with PTSD need the support of their friends and family.
 
It IS a battle that can be won team and there are treatments and support programs out there that can help and make a difference in these people’s lives.
 
Two steps forward & One step back is still ONE STEP FORWARD.
 
DEPRESSED VS DEPRESSION
 
The difference between being depressed and having depression is the difference between sadness and a mental illness and may be the most common misconception about mental illnesses.
 
Being Depressed Is Temporary.
 
Having Depression Is Something Else Entirely.
 
It can cause you to NOT do many things.
It can cause you to DO many unwanted things.
 
It can be very easy to say to someone ‘Just cheer up or just get over it’
 
But many don’t understand what’s happening within that person’s mind.
 
The effects of depression on the brain can result in structural and connective changes.
 
These include reduces functionality of:
 
– Hippocampus: can result in memory impairment.
 
– Prefrontal cortex: can result in preventing the person from getting things done (executive function) and affect their mood.
 
– Amygdala: Can directly affect their mood and emotional regulation.
 
But like all hardships, there is light at the end of the tunnel team, it doesn’t have to get sucked down in that never ending dark vortex.
If you are struggling or experiencing this or similar symptoms, the first step is always the hardest.
 
But you only have to do one thing – SPEAK
 
Once you speak, even if its just a few words then you are already on your road to recovery with the support from your family, friends and loved ones.
 
You are not a burden and you are not wasting anyone’s time.
 
Think of it this way, if your best friend was going through this, wouldn’t you want to know?
 
ANXIETY
 
It is a normal emotion. It’s your brain’s way of reacting to stress and alerting you of potential dangers ahead.
 
Everyone feels anxious now and then. You may worry about a problem at work, before taking a test, or before making an important decision.
 
Occasional Anxiety is OK.
 
Anxiety Disorders are DIFFERENT.
 
They’re a group of mental illnesses that cause constant and overwhelming anxiety and fear.
It can be challenging and frustrating to live with an anxiety disorder.
The constant worry and fear can make you feel tired and scared.
It can make you start avoiding work, school, family get-togethers, and other social situations due to the fear that it might trigger or worsen your symptoms.
 
Let alone the embarrassment of people seeing you in public when these episodes occur.
 
But listen to this team,
It’s an obstacle that can be overcome, this doesn’t have to control you,
You can control IT.
 
Boxing is a fantastic way to start as it literally takes you out of your head and into the present moment.  It gives your brain a break from constantly being on high alert mode AND allows you to re-set.
 
That’s where talking comes in.  You NEED to talk.
 
Don’t feel that you are a burden and that this is not important.
See your GP or speak to any of the available counselling services and you will see how they can help.
 
If you don’t make time for your wellness, you will be forced to make time for your illness.
 
The pics below are from the medicine ball challenge I completed.  For 14 days straight I carried this 3kg bad boy around handcuffed to me to represent the very real challenge of living with PTSD.   I’m pleased to say I raised over £300 for Help for Hero’s in the process.
 
[author] [author_image timthumb=’on’]https://12roundsboxing.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/ff3d3027-3847-44d8-a3b5-a8156b4d17cc.jpg[/author_image] [author_info]Jake Duggan is one of our trainee coaches and also works front of house. You can find him helping fundamentals drill the basics or behind the front desk. Beware, his enthusiasm is infectious![/author_info] [/author]

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Categories
Boxing tips Latest Motivation

Building the foundations

Fundamentals is an integral part of boxing. It’s the foundation on which your style is built on.
Think of it like a house. Before the house is built, the foundation must be laid first. It has to be strong and sturdy or the house will crumble.

Fundamentals can be broken into 3 parts:
[ ] Footwork
[ ] Balance
[ ] Technique

Footwork is an essential part of boxing. It gets you in and out of range. Its also part of your defence, gets you out of trouble.

Balance is an overlooked fundamental. When you throw a punch, you must be able to transfer your weight, turn your hips and deliver your power. You can’t do that without being balanced.
Balance isn’t only about delivering a punch, its also about accepting one. You will be able to absorb a punch much better if you are balanced.

Technique is about slowing everything down, focusing on the technical aspects of boxing and understanding the mechanics of how things work.

Its imperative that you are competent in the basic fundamentals before you enter the ring/start sparring.
All the advanced techniques you will no doubt progress too, will be built off the fundamentals you were taught at the start of your boxing journey.

I love teaching the fundamentals because I really enjoy watching the progression and growth over 4 weeks. It’s amazing what you can achieve in just 4 weeks, not only in terms of boxing technique but in fitness and confidence too.

You can find Scott teaching Fundamentals Mon and Wed evenings and he’s also available for 1-1 Personal Training.

Categories
Exercise Tips Fitness Regime mental health Mindset Motivation Uncategorized Weight Loss

Alex’s journey

Find something you love and get consistent with it – the physical results will come as a by product of feeling good

After battling with depression and piling on weight Alex decided it was time to make changes.  Last April he walked into 12 Rounds Boxing and started our boxing fundamentals programme.  18 months later he’s worked his way through our skills levels and is itching to get in the ring and have his first fight.  Oh and he’s lost over 4 stone in the process.  Check out his before and after pics below!

Results don’t always happen Instantly, they take time and commitment and Alex has certainly put in the work.  We are so proud and inspired by him that we interviewed him to hear his full story.  

Here’s what he had to say:

What got you into boxing? 

I’ve always been really interested in combat sports, boxing and MMA. What also interested me was the mental side of it, the chess game that you play with your opponent in the ring is unlike any other sport I’ve played.

What do you enjoy about training at 12 rounds?  

The atmosphere at 12 rounds is amazing, everyone is there to have a good time and really put in work, once you’ve been there more than a couple of times, the coaches know your name, they’re joking around with you and that laidback atmosphere couple with really focussed and high quality training is a winning combo.

What’s been your highlights/biggest achievements? 

I did my fundamentals last year in April and around that time I was about 19st 7lbs, I was able to work my way up through the programs, all th way to sparring which I love, and as off the last time I weighed myself I am now 15st on the dot. Losing all that weight is great, but the mental focus has had a huge impact on my mental health and my outlook on life. So really, I suppose my biggest highlight has been all of it, because it’s really helped to transform my health and life 😊

What’s been biggest challenge? 

The biggest challenge for me has been getting my head around footwork, anyone can throw a punch but it’s being able to move around and create angles and opportunities that also come with the mind games. It can be quite difficult to wrap your head around, but once you pull of your first pivot and angle out of a combination, it makes it all worth it.

What’s next for you? 

For me I’m preparing for when COVID restrictions are lifted and the fight school is back on, my goal has been to fight and before lockdown went into effect i was getting ready to sign up. Now that I’m down to a more natural weight for me, I’m hoping to continue working on my strength and do ruining to get in the best shape possible for a training camp.

What’s your fav class and why?

I have a real love/hate relationship with the bag and burn sessions 😅 if you want a good all body work out, those are the sessions for you; Rich and Chloe are always their to push you to your absolute limit. I also love the technical sessions, learning more about boxing and how to chain all the skills you’ve learned together is really satisfying.

 

We love Alex’s story and how boxing gives you the mental clarity, focus and feel good factor to keep going.  To get results in anything requires consistent practice.  Luckily boxing is something that’s easy to get addicted to 🙂

 

 

Categories
Boxing tips Fitness Regime Latest Motivation Uncategorized white collar

New coach in the house


At 12 Rounds our focus on real boxing technique is something we are very proud of.  Teaching our members skills by nailing the basics from the ground up is a big part of our ethos.  To learn to box properly is an art form, you must get your balance, footwork and hands all working together to throw basic combinations before you can progress.

We also believe that the best people to teach you are those who’ve walked the walk themselves.  Our trainers are all competitive boxers and Thai boxers and we are very pleased to welcome new coach Scott Smart to the team.  Scott comes with vast boxing knowledge and experience with over 50 amateur fights in the bag.

We’ve done a little Q&A so you get some cool info on the newest member of the 12 Rounds family:

Name:Scott Smart

Amateur Bouts:55.  Wins – 39, Losses – 16

Previous Club:  Islington ABC

Favourite bout– Scott’s favourite bout was away in South Africa. He and his team travelled to South Africa in 2013 to box against the Johannesburg boxing team. They were there for 10 days for a training camp and at the end of the camp they had a tournament against the Johannesburg team. Not only did Scott win his bout, but he also won the boxer of the tournament award!

Toughest bout –Scott was a guest boxer at a show against a travelling team from Denmark. The bout ended with a split decision loss, however the loss wasn’t the toughest part to take. The boxer Scott faced was extremely aggressive, constantly coming forward with little let off. By the time Scott had worked out how to box against him, it was too late.  If only he had had another round to go…

Favourite punch –Lead upper cut.  “It’s a really nice punch to land”.

Favourite boxer –Pernell Whitaker.  Scott describes him as the “perfect southpaw”.

What are you excited to bring to 12 rounds – Scott’s excited to show his perspective on boxing.  He is looking forward to teaching his style, whilst working with the 12 rounds members to develop their skills.

What excites you most about joining the team?  Making new friends and enjoying what we do!!

We are so pleased to have such an experienced boxer and coach joining the team.  If you’ve been thinking of learning to box, even if you just want to do it for fitness, our fantastic coaches are there to teach you the ropes and are in your corner all the way.

Why not join us for a trial session?  Head over to our calendar and choose taster session to book yourself in for a free trial.

We can’t wait to meet you

Big love
The 12 rounds team!

 

 

Categories
Boxing tips Mindset Motivation Uncategorized

Create Opportunities

Something we learn in boxing is about creating opportunities to land our shots.  Sometimes that means using our footwork to get into a better position or faking to draw our opponent in and set them up for that big shot 

We can look at the current situation in the same way.  Where are the opportunities? How can you use this time to your advantage? 

A lot of us may be faced with the prospect of losing our jobs in the current situation which of course is incredibly scary.  The brain loves predictability and routine so its normal to experience anxiety over all this change. Taking small actions to explore other possibilities is one way to help settle the brain.

At 12 Rounds we’re taking this opportunity to upgrade our gym.  We are very blessed to have a fantastic space that allows us to comply with social distancing so we are looking at ways we can use it better. 

So where are the opportunities for you? Could this be the time for a career change? Or maybe it’s a time to create the balance in your life you’ve always wanted? Corona virus has made most of us re-evaluate what’s important to us and become more budget conscious so maybe you don’t need the same salary you thought you once did? 

It all starts with the exploration on what makes you happy and what you really want.  What are your strengths and weaknesses? Most of us don’t really know that much about ourselves as we’ve never taken the time to do the work.   The best project you’ll ever work on is you.  Maybe nows the time to create your masterpiece 😉

 

[author] [author_image timthumb=’on’]https://12roundsboxing.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/28108716699_9c327d7aaf_z.jpg[/author_image] [author_info]Kat is the founder of 12 Rounds. She might be small but she’s a badass in the boxing ring yet also super sweet outside. Kat is super passionate about empowering women through her unique brand of mindset and boxing coaching. Blogger and creator of ‘Box to Believe’ when she’s not in the gym, Kat can be found writing, getting creative and coming up with a million more ideas to make 12 Rounds better[/author_info] [/author]